MSNBC guest says Queen Elizabeth would have a lot more ‘legitimacy’ if she ‘vocally’ led on racial justice

By | September 9, 2022

On MSNBC’s “The ReidOut” Thursday, guest Shola Mos-Shogbamimu said the late Queen Elizabeth II would have more “legitimacy and credibility” if she had been more “visible against racial injustice and inequality in Britain.”

The Queen died Thursday at 96 years old. Several progressive media figures immediately slammed her because of British colonialism. 

“The British Empire was a colonizing empire. Which made her a colonizer Queen,” Mos-Shogbamimu said. “Part of her legacy is that colonization. It is the atrocities that were committed in the name of Queen or country during the colonizing period.” 

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“Many countries fought hard, many of them, many lives were lost. People imprisoned. Even tortured in order to be set free from Britain’s colonization so to speak. And she was the Queen during that time,” Mos-Shogbamimu continued.

“For a number of people, while people are trying to be respectful of her passing, cause I’m respectful of her passing, I can respect her sense of duty but what I cannot do is to look at her legacy through rose-tinted glasses and I don’t think that would be right to do,” she said.

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Mos-Shogbamimu argued that “for a lot of people like me, if she had led by being vocally visible against racial injustice and inequality in Britain, and address both historical and present day systemic racism, she would have had a lot of legitimacy and credibility in a number of nations, including those that still have her as head of state.”

World leaders including President Joe Biden, former Presidents Donald Trump and Barack Obama, former U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson, and more have expressed their condolences for the Queen.

Queen Elizabeth first rose to the throne in 1952 when President Harry Truman was in office and Winston Churchill was the British Prime Minister.